Room 1

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…the entrance hall of the Maze.

They looked carefully at the bronze doors, trying to choose. The uncertainty of visitors is one of my little pleasures.

“It’s easy to get lost,” I said helpfully. “This can be a sinister place.” The sun glared at me through the gateway.

Something was ringing behind one of the doors. They spent some time trying to decide which door it was, not understanding that the silences of the Maze are as eloquent as the sounds.

“Decisions, decisions,” one said. “Too many decisions.”

“The story of my life,” said another.

“We don’t want to be late,” said a third, opening one of the doors.

“Nary a soul to be seen,” said the first, peering into the gloom.

I waited patiently for them to choose which way to go … into…

 - Images and text copyright 1985 by Christopher Manson
used with permission. [Purchase MAZE from Amazon]

 

Room Type:  PATH     Doors:  20  21  26  41

Solution Summary: [COLLECTION CURATED BY WHITE Raven. SEE COMMENTS FOR ADDITIONAL SOLUTION PROPOSALS.]

● The correct door is 26. [Credit: Unknown - during the 1985 contest.]

● The part of the Riddle of the Path in this room is “LIKE” spelled out on the scroll hanging on the wall. [Credit: Unknown - prior to 1990.] The symbols on the door (drum, cup, bottle, apple) spell out DCBA the opposite of ABCD. [Credit: Unknown - prior to 1990.] The backwards order of DCBA is intended to clue us to look for backwards letters elsewhere – leading to the identification “LIKE” spelled backwards on the scroll. [Credit: Vewatkin]

● The words over the door “Story,” “Tale,” (rearranged as Late) “Yarn,” (rearranged as Nary) are mentioned in the text. Not mentioned is “Fable” so this is the correct door. [Credit: Raphael Vanier]

● In the papers on the floor is “Go 17″ a possible reference to the hidden door. [Credit: Raphael Vanier]

● In the papers on the floor is “HI”. [Independent Credit: White Raven / David Gentile]

● In the papers on the floor is a smiley face. [Credit: David Gentile]

● The drawing easel: Every time you return to this room it is “back to the drawing board.” [Credit: vewatkin]

● The right hand curled end of the scroll with “IN” or “HI” on it looks like a 2. The left hand curled end of of the scroll right next to it looks like a 6. 2&6=26 the number of the correct door. Also the “IN” suggests we go in via this door. [Credit: David Gentile] Between the 2 and the 6 is an upside down F reinforcing “Fable” as the correct door. The scroll with the “IN” when viewed upside down also has a 6 on the end opposite the 2 – another 26. [Credit: White Raven]

Red Herrings:

Through Door 41 the doll’s hair is YARN.
Through Door 21 the bird is turned to show its tail/TALE
Through Door 20 the newspaper perhaps suggests STORY while the tortoise perhaps recalls an Aesop FABLE
Through Door 26 the stage is playing a FABLE or STORY

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82 thoughts on “Room 1

  1. “‘We don’t want to be late,’ said a third, opening one of the doors.”

    Late for what? This seems to be a reference to Alice in Wonderland where the rabbit didn’t want to be late to the tea party. And there happens to be a tea cup on the correct door that is being opened. Alice in wonderland can also be considered a fable.

    LIKE(0)
  2. My son and I chose door 26 by noting the cup was the only door symbol struck by sunlight. The text stated “the sun glared at me through the doorway.” Dumb luck?

    LIKE(4)
    • Eric,

      There is a whole light dark theme that runs through MAZE perhaps the shaft of light is meant to subtly indicated door 26. It hadn’t occurred to me that the fact that the Guide dislikes sunlight may be an indication that we should view it as good. Makes sense!

      Welcome to The Abyss! You are approved and may now post freely.

      White Raven

      LIKE(1)
  3. Hi there!

    Room 1: DCBA. Bronze medal = third place, counting backwards is the best solution, IMO. The fable=26 answer is awesome in its simplicity.

    I will tell you my door 26 theory, which is really out there and much more convoluted. So be prepared XD
    Since I speak four languages and japanese is one of them, I could notice the kanji for mountain straight away. It’s the most visible scribble on the upper side of the easel. Not only that, there’s some sort of arrow ponting up just below the kanji, but it has a slash on its left side. Now, the bottom scribbling is a minus sign with a slash on its right side. So, if we remove the red herrings (the slashes), we are left with the mountain kanji, an arrow pointing up and a minus sign. The kanji for mountain is radical 46, so we need to substract the number on top of it…which happens to be 20! In the end, we are left with 26 as the answer.

    LIKE(2)
    • 228850/2 from Argentina,

      You are our first poster from Argentina, or South America for that matter. Can we call you “228″? Or “Argentina?”

      Is the “228850/2″ a cypher? Let’s see… 114425 is 228850 divided by 2. If we break the numbers into 1-14-4-25 it spells “ANDY” in direct alphanumeric substitution. Is this right? Can we call you “Andy?”

      Your Kanji solution is impressive! I am not sold on the minus symbol yet but that three prong symbol really does look like the Kanji for mountain. I have added a picture of the symbol to the related images for Room 1.

      Welcome to The Abyss!

      White Raven

      LIKE(0)
  4. If you assign each letter in FABLE a number (like A=1, B=2, etc) and add those numbers up you get 26, which is equal to the number below the word FABLE. None of the other doors’ words equal the number on the door. Also, if you use the same alphabet-number code to add up LIKE, you get 37. The number 37 is “like” 26, except for 11. It looks like the number 11 is written at the top of the backwards LIKE poster.

    LIKE(1)
    • Tami,

      Welcome to The Abyss! You have been approved and may now post freely.

      The FABLE=26 solution was originally offered by Hidden Mystery on his blog and posted here by Dave Gentile July 2014. It appears to be an amazing coincidence. There is alphanumeric substitution in MAZE but when it occurs it is hinted in some manner that we should be doing it. Perhaps this room is an exception? I am uncertain.

      The LIKE -11 solution appears to be yours alone and it is a very inventive solution! This appears also to be a coincidence unless we can find a reason for doing alphanumeric substitution and a reason for subtracting the 11 as opposed to adding it. Perhaps we will find these answers in time.

      Coincidence or not it is a great find, well done!

      White Raven

      LIKE(0)
    • Couldn’t we consider “AB” = alpha-beta = alphabet in FABLE (together with alphabet clue in door objects) paired with the door number, 26, the number associated with the entire alphabet, to be a signal to try alphanumeric?

      LIKE(0)
  5. Bronze. Seems like an odd thing to make doors out of. Is there something special about the material or does suggest the bronze age? Maybe a script from the bronze age is on the papers. I think the symbols are for something other than “hi” and “go 17″ and “like”. And “trap” in the other room’s case.

    LIKE(3)
    • You know, all I can think of is bronze medal, in other words, 3rd place. With the door letters going A to D and the right door being C, that’s something I guess…

      As for the word “like,” it’s confirmed in the publisher’s solution, so it has to be in this room somewhere…

      LIKE(1)
    • I actually really like Shelley’s idea here that the doors are Bronze to tell us that a lot of the references in MAZE are from the Bronze Age (Greek myths, Minoan civilization, etc).

      LIKE(1)
    • Shelley & 515,

      I like both the bronze age idea and the bronze medal idea, could be either… or neither, but both ideas are imaginative and worth further thought. Perhaps something will clinch one of these solutions in the future.

      White Raven

      LIKE(0)
  6. The square with a dot could be a way of saying 41. The symbols to the left and right are made of four lines each. So are the two symbols on the easel. Probably nothing but you know..

    LIKE(1)

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